First Battle of Arras 1914

The Battle of Arras was part of a larger piece of the first part of World War I called “The Race to the Sea.” In this string of battles, the main objective was not to fully take over the opposing side, but to not let them flank or curl around your side of the trenches. With both sides trying to accomplish this goal it became pretty apparent that the front would move side to side until it reaches the other rather than gaining enemy land. In this specific battle the main countries involved are France with General Louis Maud’huy as the commander, and Germany with Crown Prince Rupprecht as its commander. This battle took place in the Northern Part of France near a town named Arras. This battle lasted for several days going from the first of October to the fourth of October in 1914. The main objective for the French in this battle was to out flank the German Army on the North flank. This however was also the objective of the German Army during this battle, so when the French attacked on the first of October near Douai, France, the German army was there waiting and prepared to counter attack. The Germans then attack slightly farther South, the result from this was a withdrawal of French troops towards the city of Arras where both sides attempted to take the city; however, neither side could fully enclose the city. The Germans in this part of the war are still attempting to move directly west as to cut off a main industrial and agricultural region of France. Also by heading straight west Belgium would be completely occupied by Germany and secluded from the Allies. The result of this battle was a French defensive victory for not allowing the Germans to take the city of Arras, but neither side could accomplish their goals in the race to the sea. Also the number of casualties from the battle is not known.

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